Tuesday, October 10, 2017

Week of 10 October 2017

"Education is not the filling of a pail, but the lighting of a fire." - William Butler Yeats


The goal of this English class is to produce critical thinkers. Students are not only reading for comprehension but for meaning and relevancy of the work as a whole. Literature is also an example of good writing. The writing improves when a student reads. Vocabulary also improves because the student is learning to read in context. We want successful students who can think critically and communicate effectively. 


English 12:  Why do we need heroes?  Is it more important to win or to take a stand?

Students will read a variety of poems based on heroism and war.  They will be asked to identify the importance of word choice (diction) and tone for interpretation.  Students will create a thesis statement (for a compare/contrast essay) and an outline to analyze and interpret the tone and message of the poet towards heroism in war (sacrifice/success).  Poetic devices will be identified and discussed.  They will then be asked to create an argumentative essay utilizing the variety of poems read from Unit 1. Students will be asked to write a complete essay on heroic traits and show whether it is more important to win or to take a stand.

English 11:  What is the meaning of Freedom?

Students will continue to read informational texts on the Founders of the Constitution.  Students will be asked to respond to the text by identifying any unknown vocabulary, highlighting, asking questions and applying relevancy through connections.  Students have been given a Constitution packet that includes a chart for research on a particular founder, ideals found in the Constitution, and Argument outlines.  The packet, along with the rubric will help guide students as they create  the Founders PowerPoint with a perspective.

Public Speaking:  How do basic speaking and listening skills help us to communicate?

Students will work on their Introductory Speeches which will begin on Thursday, 10/12. There will be peer critiquing and discussion.  Chapters 10 & 12 are due on 10/17.  Chapters 11, 13, and 14 are due on 10/20.  One-to-one conferencing  for the Introductory Speech will begin on Monday, 10/16.

Keystone Literature Workshop:  How does my interaction with the text provoke thinking and
                                                      response?

Students will learn word dissection and analysis.  They have been asked to create a board game using word parts.  Students, working cooperatively will write instructions, create boards and board pieces, play, and learn affixes and roots through experience and application. They have been given a rubric. Word dissection, analysis, and vocabulary in concept are necessary tools to respond to the text.

Tuesday, October 3, 2017

Week of 3 October 2017

"Education is not the filling of a pail, but the lighting of a fire." - William Butler Yeats


The goal of this English class is to produce critical thinkers. Students are not only reading for comprehension but for meaning and relevancy of the work as a whole. Literature is also an example of good writing. The writing improves when a student reads. Vocabulary also improves because the student is learning to read in context. We want successful students who can think critically and communicate effectively. 


English 12:  Why do we need heroes?  Is it more important to win or to take a stand?

Students will complete there Beowulf projects on Tuesday, October 3rd.  They will need to upload their projects onto Google Classroom.  They have been given the code to join.  Students will review Daily #12 on Wednesday (projects have taken the priority).  They will take a test on Beowulf on Wednesday.  Daily #14 will be assigned on Thursday.  Students will read a variety of poems based on heroism and war.  They will be asked to complete identify the importance of word choice (diction) and tone for interpretation.  Students will create PowerPoints to analyze and interpret the tone and message of the poet towards heroism in war (sacrifice/success).

English 11:  What is the meaning of Freedom?

Students will complete Powtoons and upload them to Google Classroom by Tuesday, October 3rd.  They will begin/complete Daily 13.  Students will complete a Test on the Declaration.  On Thursday, they will read an informational article on the Founders of the Constitution.  Students will be asked to respond to the text by identifying any unknown vocabulary, highlighting, asking questions and applying relevancy through connections.  The informational article will prepare them for the research and the creation of the Founders PowerPoint.

Public Speaking:  How do basic speaking and listening skills help us to communicate?

Students will work on their Introductory Speeches.  Outlines are due around 10/5.  Students will receive facilitation.  They will review the analysis of two Commencement speeches.  Students will focus on delivery skills and rhetoric skills.  Chapter 6 is due on 10/2.  Chapter 8 is due on 10/4 and Chapter 9 is due on 10/6.

Keystone Literature Workshop:  How does my interaction with the text provoke thinking and
                                                      response?

Students will learn word dissection and analysis.  They have been asked to create a board game using word parts.  Students, working cooperatively will write instructions, create boards and board pieces, play, and learn affixes and roots through experience and application. They have been given a rubric. Word dissection, analysis, and vocabulary in concept are necessary tools to respond to the text.

Tuesday, September 26, 2017

Week of 25 September 2017

"Education is not the filling of a pail, but the lighting of a fire." - William Butler Yeats


The goal of this English class is to produce critical thinkers. Students are not only reading for comprehension but for meaning and relevancy of the work as a whole. Literature is also an example of good writing. The writing improves when a student reads. Vocabulary also improves because the student is learning to read in context. We want successful students who can think critically and communicate effectively. 


English 12:  Why do we need heroes?  Is it more important to win or to take a stand?

Students have begun work on the Beowulf Project.  Students have chosen one of the following options:  movie trailer/critique, newspaper/magazine article, children's book, puppet show, or a graphic novel.  They will demonstrate comprehension and knowledge by applying themes, symbols, elements of the epic or elegy, characters, setting, and plot of Beowulf.  Students have been given instructions/requirements, worksheets, daily logs, examples, and rubrics.  They will be using Chromebooks.

English 11:  What is the meaning of Freedom?

Students will identify the ideas/concepts of the time period and apply them to the analysis of the Declaration of Independence. Students will complete worksheets, participate in discussion, and write a response. They will be required to compare the First Draft of the Declaration and the Final Draft. Students will summarize and analyze what they have read and complete a POWTOON.  They have agreed upon a Rubric.  Students will work in pairs to create a POWTOON that will support the purpose statement.

Public Speaking:  How do basic speaking and listening skills help us to communicate?

Students will put their reading and discussions to work.  They will complete reading and analyzing two Commencement Speeches, due on the 27th and the 29th.  Students will identify organization, rhetoric skills, and delivery. They will discuss the importance of word choice, content, rhythm, and presentation skills.  Students will take notes, complete worksheets, and participate in discussions.  Topics for the Introductory Speech are due this week.  Chapter 4 is due on the 26th.

Keystone Literature Workshop:  How does my interaction with the text provoke thinking and
                                                      response?

Students will complete a Sample Test.  They will check and critique their own work on multiple choice questions.  Students will then refocus their goals in reading and writing after identifying specific skill strengths and weaknesses.   Students will learn to decipher test questions, use the process of elimination, and practice written responses.

Monday, September 18, 2017

Week of 18 September 2017

"Education is not the filling of a pail, but the lighting of a fire." - William Butler Yeats


The goal of this English class is to produce critical thinkers. Students are not only reading for comprehension but for meaning and relevancy of the work as a whole. Literature is also an example of good writing. The writing improves when a student reads. Vocabulary also improves because the student is learning to read in context. We want successful students who can think critically and communicate effectively. 


English 12:  Why do we need heroes?  Is it more important to win or to take a stand?

Students will read, respond, discuss, and share information and ideas.  Students will identify the difference between the epic and the elegy, christian and pagan themes, and winning vs. taking a stand.  They will read, analyze, and engage in discussions through literature circles on Beowulf. Students will be responsible for individual notes and analyses, participating in small group discussions, and leading/teaching large group discussions.  Through guided discussion and peer interaction, students will share their response to the relevancy of the poem.  Students will be preparing themselves for the choice of creating a:  movie trailer/critique, newspaper/magazine article, or a graphic novel.  They will demonstrate comprehension and knowledge by applying themes, symbols, elements of the epic or elegy, characters, setting, and plot of Beowulf.

English 11:  What is the meaning of Freedom?

CDT will be on Monday and Tuesday.

Students will identify the ideas/concepts of the time period and apply them to the analysis of the Declaration of Independence. Students will complete worksheets, participate in discussion, and write a response. They will be required to compare the First Draft of the Declaration and the Final Draft. Students will summarize and analyze what they have read and complete a POWTOON.  They will become a part of the grading process by helping to create a Rubric for the POWTOON.

Public Speaking:  How do basic speaking and listening skills help us to communicate?

Students will put their reading and discussions to work.  They will complete reading and analyzing two Commencement Speeches.  Students will identify organization, rhetoric skills, and delivery. They will discuss the importance of word choice, content, rhythm, and presentation skills.  Students will take notes, complete worksheets, and participate in discussions.  They will also be asked to read and complete Ch. 1-5 in their text.

Keystone Literature Workshop:  How does my interaction with the text provoke thinking and
                                                      response?

Students will complete a Diagnostic Test.  They will check and critique their own work on multiple choice questions.  Students will then refocus their goals in reading and writing after identifying specific skill strengths and weaknesses.   Students will learn to decipher test questions, use the process of elimination, and practice written responses.

Tuesday, September 12, 2017

Week of 11 September 2017

"Education is not the filling of a pail, but the lighting of a fire." - William Butler Yeats


The goal of this English class is to produce critical thinkers. Students are not only reading for comprehension but for meaning and relevancy of the work as a whole. Literature is also an example of good writing. The writing improves when a student reads. Vocabulary also improves because the student is learning to read in context. We want successful students who can think critically and communicate effectively. 


English 12:  Why do we need heroes?  Is it more important to win or to take a stand?

Students will read, respond, discuss, and share information and ideas.  Students will identify the difference between the epic and the elegy, christian and pagan themes, and winning vs. taking a stand.  They will read, analyze, and engage in discussions through literature circles on Beowulf. Students will be responsible for individual notes and analyses, participating in small group discussions, and leading/teaching large group discussions.  Through guided discussion and peer interaction, students will share their response to the relevancy of the poem.  Students will be preparing themselves for the choice of creating a:  movie trailer/critique, newspaper/magazine article, or a graphic novel.  They will demonstrate comprehension and knowledge by applying themes, symbols, elements of the epic or elegy, characters, setting, and plot of Beowulf.

English 11:  What is the meaning of Freedom?

Students will continue working on Unit 1. They will be required to respond to informational articles on the historical perspectives that led to America's independence.  Students will highlight, annotate, and make connections to the informational literature.  They will utilize vocabulary in context, identify tone and perspective. Students will create a T Chart and apply the ideas in a written response. They will identify the ideas/concepts of the time period and apply them to the analysis of the Declaration of Independence. Students will complete worksheets, participate in discussion, and write a response. They will be required to compare the First Draft of the Declaration and the Final Draft. Students will summarize and analyze what they have read and complete a POWTOON.  They will become a part of the grading process by helping to create a Rubric for the POWTOON.

Public Speaking:  How do basic speaking and listening skills help us to communicate?

Students will put their reading and discussions to work.  They will complete reading and analyzing two Commencement Speeches.  Students will identify organization, rhetoric skills, and delivery. They will discuss the importance of word choice, content, rhythm, and presentation skills.  Students will take notes, complete worksheets, and participate in discussions.  They will also be asked to read and complete Ch. 5 in their text.

Keystone Literature Workshop:  How does my interaction with the text provoke thinking and
                                                      response?

Students will continue to work on response essays.  They will receive individualized facilitation to improve writing a response on a standardized test.  Students will recognize and utilize the writing process.  They will check and critique their own work on multiple choice questions.  Students will learn to decipher test questions, use the process of elimination, and practice written responses.

Tuesday, September 5, 2017

Week of 4 September 2017

"Education is not the filling of a pail, but the lighting of a fire." - William Butler Yeats


The goal of this English class is to produce critical thinkers. Students are not only reading for comprehension but for meaning and relevancy of the work as a whole. Literature is also an example of good writing. The writing improves when a student reads. Vocabulary also improves because the student is learning to read in context. We want successful students who can think critically and communicate effectively. 

English 12:  Why do we need heroes?  Is it more important to win or to take a stand?

Students will be responsible for reading, analyzing, and responding to the articles that will enable them to successfully complete reading and analyzing the epic poem.  They will read, respond, discuss, and share information and ideas.  Students will identify the difference between the epic and the elegy.  They will read, analyze, and engage in discussions through literature circles on Beowulf. Students will be responsible for individual notes and analyses, participating in small group discussions, and leading/teaching large group discussions.   Through guided discussion and peer interaction, students will share their response to the relevancy of the poem.  Students will be preparing themselves for the choice of creating a:  movie trailer/critique, newspaper/magazine article, or a graphic novel.  They will demonstrate comprehension and knowledge by applying themes, symbols, elements of the epic or elegy, characters, setting, and plot of Beowulf.

English 11:  What is the meaning of Freedom?

Students will continue working on Unit 1. They will be required to respond to informational articles on the historical perspectives that led to America's independence.  Students will highlight, annotate, and make connections to the informational literature.  They will utilize vocabulary in context, identify tone and perspective. Students will create a T Chart and apply the ideas in a written response. They will identify the ideas/concepts of the time period and apply them to the analysis of the Declaration of Independence. Students will complete worksheets, participate in discussion, and write a response. They will be required to compare the First Draft of the Declaration and the Final Draft.

Public Speaking:  How do basic speaking and listening skills help us to communicate?

Students have been introduced to the course requirements.  Students will be reading and responding to information found in the text to help them learn the importance of both listening and speaking skills when writing a speech.  The application of information will aid with the writing of their Introductory Speech.  They will ask questions, participate in discussions, and create a safe, productive environment.   The first Chapter will be due on Friday, September 6th.

Keystone Literature Workshop:  How does my interaction with the text provoke thinking and
                                                      response?

Students will continue to work on response essays.  They will receive individualized facilitation to improve writing a response on a standardized test.  Students will recognize and utilize the writing process.  They will check and critique their own work on multiple choice questions.  Students will learn to decipher test questions, use the process of elimination, and practice written responses.  

Monday, August 28, 2017

Week of August 28th 2017

"Education is not the filling of a pail, but the lighting of a fire." - William Butler Yeats


The goal of this English class is to produce critical thinkers. Students are not only reading for comprehension but for meaning and relevancy of the work as a whole. Literature is also an example of good writing. The writing improves when a student reads. Vocabulary also improves because the student is learning to read in context. We want successful students who can think critically and communicate effectively. 

Welcome Back!

English 12:  What makes a hero?

Students have been introduced to the course requirements.  This year will focus on how we,  as individuals, can make life better...not easier.  We look forward to creating an environment that respects individual thought, creative production, and a diligent work ethic. Students will be responsible for promoting thoughtful discussions about the relevancy  of literature, utilizing/applying critical thinking skills to the literature, and demonstrating their writing skills through written responses.  They will be given an informational article on the culture of the Anglo-Saxons.  Students will be responsible for reading, analyzing, and responding to the article that will enable them to successfully complete reading and analyzing the epic poem.  Students will begin with identifying characteristics of the hero type through the modern day superhero found in graphic novels and comparing/contrasting to the epic hero found in Beowulf.  They will identify elements of the epic poem and graphic novel writing.  Through guided discussion and peer interaction, students will share their response to the relevancy of the poem.

English 11:  What is the meaning of Freedom?

Students have been introduced to the course requirements.  Students will begin working on Unit 1. They will be required to respond to informational articles on the historical perspectives that led to America's independence.  Students will highlight, annotate, and make connections to the informational literature.  They will utilize vocabulary in context, identify tone and perspective. Students will create a T Chart and apply the ideas in a written response. They will identify the ideas/concepts of the time period and apply them to the analysis of the Declaration of Independence. Students will complete worksheets, participate in discussion, and write a response. They will be required to compare the First Draft of the Declaration and the Final Draft.


Public Speaking:  How do basic speaking and listening skills help us to communicate?

Students have been introduced to the course requirements.  Students will be reading and responding to information found in the text to help them learn the importance of both listening and speaking skills when writing a speech.  The application of information will aid with the writing of their Introductory Speech.  The first Chapter will be due on Friday, September 1st.

Keystone Remediation:   How does my interaction with the text provoke thinking and response?

Students have been introduced to the course requirements.  This course requires a student to show improvement in standards that need to be strengthened.  Each student will receive a goal(s) to be reached for individual improvement.  Every student is responsible to focus and work on improving a skill for success on the Keystone.